E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial mechatronic model sells for $2.5 million

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial original mechatronic model sells for whopping $2.56 million at Julien’s Auctions’ Icons and Idols event

One very lucky (and wealthy) fan of the 1982 classic E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial is walking away with a piece of movie history.

The centerpiece of Julien’s Auctions’ Icons and Idols event over the weekend was the original mechatronic model of E.T. created by Carlo Rambaldi, which sold for $2.56 million, according to the auction house.

A number of other items from Steven Spielberg’s classic were also sold, including an original maquette model, a number of original design illustrations and a BMX bicycle used by actor Robert Cardoza on the set.

History: One very lucky (and wealthy) fan of the 1982 classic E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial is walking away with a piece of movie history

Sold: The centerpiece of Julien’s Auctions’ Icons and Idols event over the weekend was the original mechatronic model of E.T. created by Carlo Rambaldi, which sold for $2.56 million, according to the auction house

Sold: The centerpiece of Julien’s Auctions’ Icons and Idols event over the weekend was the original mechatronic model of E.T. created by Carlo Rambaldi, which sold for $2.56 million, according to the auction house

Also sold: A number of other items from Steven Spielberg’s classic were also sold, including an original maquette model, a number of original design illustrations and a BMX bicycle used by actor Robert Cardoza on the set

The ‘hero #1’ mechatronic model was expected to fetch between $2.5 million and $3 million when originally announced by Julien’s in November.

The model was created by Rambaldi, known as ‘The Father of E.T.’ with this one-of-a-kind model pre-dating the CGI graphics used for Hollywood blockbusters today.

This model features 85 different points of movement and is considered an ‘engineering masterpiece.’

Expected: The ‘hero #1’ mechatronic model was expected to fetch between $2.5 million and $3 million when originally announced by Julien’s in November

Engineering: This model features 85 different points of movement and is considered an ‘engineering masterpiece’

The model, constructed in 1981, was operated by twelve professional animators, all supervised and coordinated by Carlo Rambaldi. 

Rambaldi used duraluminium, described as, ‘a light yet strong aluminium alloy, one of the earliest types of age-hardenable aluminium alloys.’

The points of movement included, ‘facial expressions, nose, eyes, mouth, lids movement, neck movement, shoulders, arms, hands, fingers, chest and abdomen rotations, via a combination of cables connected to electronic apparatus and mechanical elements.’

Controlled: The model, constructed in 1981, was operated by twelve professional animators, all supervised and coordinated by Carlo Rambaldi

Also going under the hammer at the auction was the original maquette that director Steven Spielberg used to approve E.T.’s design, which sold for $125,000.

Also selling for $125,000 was an original Kuwahara brand BMX bicycle used in E.T. by Robert Cardoza, a stunt rider for K.C. Martel’s character Greg.

A number of different concept illustrations for E.T.’s character design, including one that sold for $12,500 and showed what the alien’s skeletal system would look like. 

Maquette: Maquette:: Also going under the hammer at the auction was the original maquette that director Steven Spielberg used to approve E.T.’s design, which sold for $125,000

Bike: Also selling for $125,000 was an original Kuwahara brand BMX bicycle used in E.T. by Robert Cardoza, a stunt rider for K.C. Martel’s character Greg

Design: A number of different concept illustrations for E.T.’s character design, including one that sold for $12,500 and showed what the alien’s skeletal system would look like

E.T. hit theaters in June 1982 and would go on to become the highest-grossing film of all-time, a record that stood for 11 years before it was broken by another Spielberg blockbuster – 1993’s Jurassic Park.

The film also earned nine Oscar nominations and it won five Oscars, including Best Visual Effects.

It was added to the United States National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 1994 and was re-released in theaters back in August to celebrate its 40th anniversary. 

Highest-grossing: E.T. hit theaters in June 1982 and would go on to become the highest-grossing film of all-time, a record that stood for 11 years before it was broken by another Spielberg blockbuster – 1993’s Jurassic Park

Registry: It was added to the United States National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 1994 and was re-released in theaters back in August to celebrate its 40th anniversary

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