The one reason Princess Mary is the world's most popular royal

Mary the ‘People’s Princess’ wows with four months of stylish wardrobe repeats – after Meghan Markle wore a $12,200 outfit to meet public school students in Harlem

  • Crown Princess Mary of Denmark has had a busy three months of royal events
  • But rather than roll out a new wardrobe, she recycled some of her favourite looks
  • Denmark’s future queen, 49, is known for her passion for sustainable fashion 
  • She recently wore a customised H&M skirt for the fourth time in three years
  • The Princess also repeated old Dolce & Gabbana, Prada and Cult Gaia dresses

Crown Princess Mary has just wrapped up an extraordinarily busy calendar of royal engagements that has taken her across Europe over the past four months.

But rather than rolling out a new wardrobe like most royals might, Denmark’s future queen, 49, recycled some of her favourite looks with typically effortless flair. 

The much-loved Princess, born Mary Donaldson in Hobart, Tasmania, proved she’s not afraid of outfit repeating by slipping into old dresses from designers including Dolce & Gabbana, Marc Jacobs, and Cult Gaia.

The mother-of-four, who shares Prince Christian, 15, Princess Isabella, 14, and 10-year-old twins Prince Vincent and Princess Josephine with her husband, Prince Frederik, 53, also wore a customised H&M skirt for the fourth time in three years.

Mary’s penchant for repurposing pieces stands in stark contrast to the likes of Meghan Markle, former Duchess of Sussex, who recently wore a $12,200 ensemble to a Harlem public school where 94 per cent of students reportedly get free meals. 


Crown Princess Mary looks radiant in the same $865 Cult Gaia dress in Copenhagen in January 2017 (left) and on an official visit to Lithuania on September 30, 2021 (right)

THE TAILOR-MADE SKIRT

The Princess proved she has no fear of outfit repeating as she stepped out in her favourite green skirt for a glittering engagement in Copenhagen on September 25. 

She looked radiant in the $265 H&M Conscious dress she had tailored into a skirt at the Crown Prince Couple’s Awards, a collection of cultural prizes she presents each year with husband Prince Frederik, 53.

The awards were established 17 years ago as a wedding gift from the Bikuben Foundation, after the couple married at Copenhagen Cathedral on May 14, 2004. 

It is the fourth time in three years that Mary has been spotted in the customised skirt since she first wore it to the launch of Copenhagen Fashion Summit in 2018.

The mother-of-four styled the statement piece with an elegant black top and a pair of $1,225 mesh panelled pumps from one of her favourite footwear designers, Gianvito Rossi. 

Crown Princess Mary proved she’s not afraid of outfit repeating as she stepped out in her favourite green skirt for the annual Crown Prince Couple’s Awards on September 25

Denmark’s future queen had this $265 H&M Conscious dress cut into a skirt back in 2018

THE HOMETOWN TRIBUTE

In June, Mary paid tribute to her Australian roots by wearing one of her favourite dresses from a Sydney fashion label to a concert in Odense, 167km south of the capital, Copenhagen.

The Princess last wore the $825 Moss & Spy gown on a three-day tour of Paris in October 2019 when she visited with Prince Frederik, 

She wore the same blue silk heels from Gianvito Rossi that she wore in France almost two years ago and carried the same midnight coloured clutch bag. 

Princess Mary wore one of her favourite dresses from a Sydney fashion label at the ‘Mind of Music’ concert in Odense on June 4, 2021


Mary last wore the gown (right)  on a three-day tour of Paris in October 2019 (left) when she visited with her husband, Prince Frederik, 53

THE DOLCE & GABBANA DRESSES

The Crown Princess was photographed inspecting the dinner arrangements before an event inside Amalienborg Palace for her namesake organisation, The Mary Foundation, in September, wearing a burgundy lace Dolce & Gabbana dress.

The future queen previously donned the frock in January 2017 for a gala event in honour of the President of Iceland’s visit to Denmark. 

Weeks later, Mary slipped into a red Dolce & Gabbana dress on an official visit to Lithuania in early October, which she last wore for a family gathering at Amalienborg Palace in April 2018. 

The thrifty royal followed the theme by wearing the same $865 cobalt blue number from Cult Gaia during her Lithuania trip that she wore when the President of Iceland visited four years ago.

Mary slipped into a red Dolce & Gabbana dress on an official visit to Lithuania in October 2021

The Princess last wore the dress for a family gathering at Amalienborg Palace in April 2018

THE TRUSTY PINK FROCK

Mary wore one of her favourite Marc Jacobs dresses to the unveiling of her own sustainably-made portrait at Milan Design Week in September. 

The Princess attended an exhibition at the Museo Nazionale Scienza e Tecnologia Leonardo Da Vinci, which featured an image of herself made entirely from recycled material.

The artwork depicted the Australian-born Princess in a tiara, a blue sash and an ornate brooch, with her head glancing to the side. Shards of broken glass were used to create a mirrored reflection in the background.

The frock was first seen on Mary during a visit to BLOX in Copenhagen in September 2020.

Mary touched down in Italy for Milan Design Week in September and kicked off the event at an unveiling of her own sustainably-made portrait in one of her favourite Marc Jacobs dresses

Mary first wore the dress at the opening of The BLOX – Build Back Better Summit – in Copenhagen in September 2020

Mary is a royal who practices what she preaches.

A passionate advocate for sustainability, the Princess is known for throwing support behind environmental initiatives including the Global Fashion Agenda and Fair Festival, Denmark’s largest digital showcase of sustainable products. 

In a speech made at Aarhus City Hall in April 2021, Mary issued a warning about the impact of consumption on planet and the role it has played in accelerating climate change.

‘It is easy as individuals to feel powerless in the face of something as large and complex as climate change and its consequences,’ she told the crowd.

‘But we can – both you and I – help make a difference through our personal choices and actions. We must become wiser, greener, more circular, more innovative and visionary in our thinking, approach and our collaboration and our solutions.’ 

Source: Read Full Article