Rachel Riley defends wearing photoshopped Jeremy Corbyn T-shirt after backlash

The Countdown presenter came-under-fire for wearing a T-shirt, featuring a doctored image of Jeremy Corbyn on the front.

Rachel Riley's white T-shirt featured an old picture of Corbyn with the phrase "Jeremy Corbyn is a racist endeavour," emblazoned across the front.

The original photo was taken in 1984, and it shows the Labour leader being arrested while protesting the South African apartheid.

However, the real slogan printed on Corbyn's placard, which read: "Defend the right to protest against apartheid. Join this picket," was replaced.

Riley, 33, was snapped wearing the controversial T-shirt following exiting the ITV studios in Salford, following Tuesday's televised leaders' debate.

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Sharing an image of herself, Rachel wrote: "I didn’t feel comfortable knowing my workplace was to be full of racists tonight. I don’t I didn’t feel comfortable knowing my workplace was to be full of racists tonight. I don’t endorse Boris, but I do endorse #NeverCorbyn. Please see my pinned thread if you still don’t understand why. #LeadersDebate #LabourAntisemitism."

Rachel, who is expecting her first child with Strictly's Pasha Kovalev, has been highly vocal about her criticism of the Labour party for quite some time.

In March, "Boycott Rachel Riley" cruelly trended on Twitter.

It came after Macmillan Cancer Support removed an appeal for donations advert, which was placed on The Canary website.

The advert sat under an article on the site, with a headline which read: "While all eyes were on Chequers, a TIG MP travelled 3,000 miles to smear Jeremy Corbyn."

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Macmillan's ad removal came after Rachel Riley and a number of other 'anti-fake news' activists tried to encourage the charity to take the appeal down.

Responding to concerns, Macmillan tweeted: "Thanks for letting us know Rachel Riley and Ortis Deeley. We hear your concerns about where our ads appear, and will remove this placement whilst we remove this placement whilst we review the platforms used for our online ads."

A tweet sent on Monday from a Twitter account called Dave Goldstein appealed to the charity to remove the advert over concerns about the site.

The appeal was shared the next day by Riley and a group of activists called Stop Funding Fake News.

The group targets websites which are accused of publishing fake news stories by calling on brands to boycott them.

Riley encouraged her 657,000 Twitter followers to support Stop Funding Fake News.

She said: "A small way we can all make a difference against hate, and stop people profiting from dividing us."

Riley has faced backlash for being one of the people to encourage Macmillan to remove the advert on The Canary.

One Twitter user fumed: "How about we all tweet #BoycottRachelRiley to show our disgust at her using a cancer charity to attack independent left-wing media?"

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While another continued: "#BoycottRachelRiley I can't believe she's stooped so low."

However some Twitter users were quick to take Rachel's side.

A tweet sent on Monday from a Twitter account called Dave Goldstein appealed to the charity to remove the advert over concerns about the site.

Comedian Dave Baddiel said: "Rachel Riley is a member of an ethnic minority calling out racism vs that minority. For the crank left to start a #BoycottRachelRiley hashtag, something they'd never do to a member of any other minority, is just an example of how, as far as they're concerned, #JewsDontCount."

While Comedian Katherine Ryan continued: "Being looped in with Rachel on social media provides a harrowing insight into the disgusting vitriol and VERY REAL anti-Semitism she and people of Jewish faith experience. I absolutely stand with her and against that."

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