What is the meaning of CHIS in Line of Duty?

AFTER a two year wait, fans were thrilled when Line of Duty returned to our screens last night complete with the usual cop jargon.

But one acronym in particular – CHIS – left viewers especially baffled as they watched detectives delve into another murder mystery.

What is the meaning of CHIS in Line of Duty?

Twitter was rife last night with fans asking with CHIS stood for as the latest season of Line of Duty kicked off – with many confusing it for a crude word.

Soon, the term "jizz" was trending on the site as many thought they were hearing the slang word for semen.

The confusion was so widespread the BBC voiceover took it upon herself to clarify the acronym as the end credits rolled.

One viewer joked: "#LineOfDuty new drinking game. Drink every time someone on Line of Duty says chis."

But CHIS actually stands for Covert Human Intelligence Sources – in other words, an informant who establishes or maintains a personal or other relationship with another person for the covert purpose.

Acronyms in Line Of Duty explained

We may be on the sixth season, but there are still acronyms that catch us out.

Here are the meanings of key terms used by characters explained to save you searching on Google:

AC-12 – Anti-Corruption Unit 12: A dedicated unit that holds responsibility for investigating corruption within the police force.

AFO – Authorised Firearms Officer: An officer who has been authorised, and has been trained, to carry and use firearms

ANPR – Automatic Number Plate Recognition: Technology that uses optical character recognition on images to read vehicle registration plates to create vehicle location data

ARV – Armed Response Vehicle: Used by AFOs to respond to incidents that are believed to involved firearms as they have been adapted to accommodate specialist equipment

CHIS – Covert Human Intelligence Sources: An informant, often undercover agents who prevent the worst types of crimes — terrorism, drug dealing, gun crime and child sexual exploitation

DIR – Digital Interview Recording: A device used to record police interviews

FI – Forensic Investigator: Someone who gathers and preserves physical evidence at a crime scene to be examined

IP Address – Internet Protocol address: A numerical label assigned to each device connected to a computer network that uses Internet Protocol for communication

IOPC – Independent Officer for Police Conduct: A non-departmental public body in England and Wales which is responsible for overseeing the system for handling complaints made aginst forces

IR – Incident Report: A formal recording of facts that relate to an incident

MOPI – Management of Police Information: Principles that provide a way of balancing proportionality and necessity that are central to effective police information management

OCG – Organised Crime Group: Serious crime planned, coordinated and conducted by a group of people working together

PACE – Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984: A code of practice that regulates police powers and protects public rights

REG 15 – A regulation 15 notice: Notice that advises an officer that a complaint has been made or a conduct matter has come to light that warrants an investigation

RIPA – Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000: Regulates the power of public bodies to carry of investigation and surveillance, and covers interception of communication

RTC – Road Traffic Collision: A crash between vehicles

SFC – Strategic Firearms Commander: The person who has overall strategic command of firearms operations, with responsibility and accountability for directions given

TFC – Tactical Firearms Officer:Someone who provides guidance on the appropriate use of different tactical operations

UCO – Undercover Operative: A method used by law enforcement and intelligent agencies whereby officers where civilian clothes to "fit in" and avoid detection

VPN – Virtual Private Network: The extension of a private network that includes links across a public or shared networks, such as the internet

For more acronym explanations, click here

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